E-book

How to Resolve a Small Claim with Online Arbitration

Chapter 1
Out with the Old
Why Taking a Small Claim to Court is Antiquated and Inefficient
Chapter 4
In with the New
Benefits of Using an Arbitration App & Small Claims App
Chapter 3
The Benefits
Benefits of Alternative Dispute Resolution
Chapter 2
Cost of Your Time
Contract Dispute Should Not Cost You a Day of Your Life
Chapter 5
Embrace the Change
Online Dispute Resolution is Going to Become the New Normal
Chapter 6
The Zeyo Advantage
Using Online Arbitration to Resolve Legal Disputes

Introduction

"Traditional litigation is a mistake that must be corrected... For some disputes trials will be the only means, but for many claims trials by adversarial contest must in time go the way of the ancient trial by battle and blood. Our system is too costly, too painful, too destructive, too inefficient for really civilized people."
- Former Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court Warren E. Burger.

Many of us encounter situations where there may be grounds to pursue financial restitution through the civil justice system. For example, a mechanic may have failed to properly inspect your vehicle or improperly installed a tire causing it to go flat and forcing you to buy a brand-new tire. Another example is hiring a contractor for a home repair or home improvement project that was not completed properly or within the scope of the contract. These are scenarios where you could very well have the basis to file a Complaint in a small claims court to seek economic and non-economic damages for your harms and losses. Despite having the grounds to take legal action, many people forego pursuing a small claim due to a variety of legitimate reasons such as time, expense, and uncertainty.

You may be thinking, “Well, if filing a small claim is so burdensome, I’ll just hire a lawyer to handle everything.” Not so fast. If your claim is seeking financial restitution for a few hundred dollars, or even a few thousand dollars, you are likely to run into difficulty retaining an attorney who would have interest in litigating your case, or you may discover that the calculus of hiring an attorney does not make sense (i.e. you will wind up spending more on your attorney than you could expect to recover through a court judgment).     

If you cannot find a lawyer to take on your case, or you do not want to deal with the significant expense associated with retaining legal counsel, the ball is in your court when it comes to taking legal action. As mentioned, many people opt not to take legal action after discovering the litany of steps necessary to simply file a small claim, the amount of time you’ll need to invest in the legal dispute, and the understandable anxiety associated with litigating a claim in a court of law.

In many respects, the legal system is unaccommodating, intimidating, and outdated. Depending on the state you reside in, your local small claims court may not accept electronically-filed Complaints, may not accept online filing fee payments, and may require you to draft a legal Complaint. This is, quite understandably, off-putting to many people with busy lives who do not have the time or inclination to become familiar with a court’s peculiar inner-workings and filing protocols.

“Citizens are using technology in every area of their lives,” said Colin Rule, vice president of online dispute resolution at Tyler Technologies, at an event co-sponsored by the American Bar Association’s Judicial Division, Section of Dispute Resolution and the National Conference of Bar Presidents. “This is how you rebalance your 401k. This is how you sign your kid up for summer camp. And when they go to the courts and someone says your hearing is going to be in 120 days and you need to file this on paper, people go, ‘Is this 1983?’ This is just not the way society works.”

The time for change is now.

Chapter 1
Out with the Old

Why Taking a Small Claim to Court is Antiquated and Inefficient

Before delving into the innovative applications and technologies available to everyday citizens to resolve numerous legal disputes, it is important to highlight just how antiquated and ineffective the current legal system is for resolving small claims and why change is necessary.

The overarching purpose of a small claims court is to enable citizens to resolve disputes involving “low-dollar” civil claims (i.e. typically less than $10,000 in value), before a judge without having to incur the expenses associated with high-stakes litigation (e.g., attorney's fees and court costs). The process of filing a civil claim in a small claims court is supposed to be simple, cost-effective and reasonably expeditious compared to more complex forms of litigation.

Many people end in small claims court to resolve the following types of disputes:

  • Recovering an unpaid debt.
  • Recovering after a contract was breached.
  • Recovering a security deposit from a landlord or tenant.
  • Recovering unpaid rent after a tenant vacates a property.
  • Recovering medical bills after an injury accident.
  • Recovering repair or replacement costs associated with damaged or destroyed personal property.

As you can see, small claims courts typically do not deal with criminal matters, domestic relations, or, as mentioned earlier, “high dollar” civil claims (e.g., filing a wrongful death lawsuit for $1,000,000 will need to be resolved in another court).

If you believe you may have a viable claim, you first need to determine whether your claim meets the jurisdictional requirements of the small claims court in your particular locality. As you can see, right off the bat, this can create confusion. Each city within each state typically has its own unique set of courts. The burden is on you to figure out which one has the jurisdictional authority over your claim. The proper "venue" for your small claim can be determined by a multitude of factors and could even depend on the particular nature of your civil claim. For example, if you are involved in a car accident, the proper venue is most often in the county in where the collision occurred or where the other motorist involved in the accident resides. If, on the other hand, your small claim relates to an alleged breach of contract, the proper venue is usually in the county where the contract was formed.

Once you figure out the proper county for filing your small claim, you then need to actually initiate a civil lawsuit by completing the appropriate paperwork with the clerk of court. Depending on where you reside, this often requires conducting copious amounts of research and locating the specific filing forms on a court’s website.

Once you have located, filled out and submitted the necessary paperwork, the court clerk will assign a hearing date. The clerk will also, in most instances, serve the opposing party (i.e. the defendant) a copy of your Complaint by certified mail and provide notice of the hearing.

There are typically fees associated both with filing the Complaint with the clerk of court and for service of process. Serving the opposing party is often completed by the county sheriff's department, a private process server, or by certified mail.

Once the legal documents have been served on the opposing party, you may be required to file an official "proof of service" with the court in order to notify the judge that the defendant received notice of the hearing date.

The hearing date will likely be set a few weeks, or even months, out in the future. During this time, the parties can gather documentation concerning the merits of the claim. The types of documentation that may be needed include:

  • Contracts
  • Letters or emails
  • Receipts
  • Cancelled checks
  • Memos
  • Photographs

Once you have collected your evidence, you will need to make sure it is organized and several copies are made. You will then need to take this evidence with you to court on the date of the hearing. Multiple hard copies are likely necessary because you could be asked to provide copies to the judge or clerk of court. It is important to make sure these documents are organized so that you can easily locate them for quick reference during the hearing.

The hearing itself can be quite the ordeal, and it is often intimidating for most people who are not used to a court setting. You will need to go before a judge (make sure to dress appropriately and turn your cell phone off). The judge will likely ask a series of questions. You will always want to be respectful and courteous to the judge and the court employees. When a question is asked, you need to be ready to speak clearly, concisely, and have documents ready to back up your statements.

This sounds like fun, right? If you are starting to get a queasy feeling in your stomach, it is understandable…and we haven’t even gotten to the difficult part yet.

Even if you prevail at the hearing, there are a litany of issues you need to be prepared for in the case. There’s the risk of a potential countersuit. This is when the opposing party (defendant) decides to file a civil claim against you. For example, if you file a small claim against your landlord for not returning your security deposit, then your landlord has the ability to turn around and file a countersuit against you alleging you damaged the townhome or apartment during the term of your lease.

In addition to the risk of a countersuit, a judgment in your favor in small claims court is not the end…it is only the beginning. By that, we mean that there is the expense and time associated with actually obtaining the amount awarded in your favor. A small claims court can only award you damages. This means if the defendant decides not to pay, you would need to pursue additional legal action to actually collect the amount owed. A court judgment does not, in and of itself, result in you getting reimbursed for your harms and losses.

A prime example of the challenges associated with collecting on a judgment is illustrated by Irene Williams. She filed a breach of contract claim against a defendant who failed to pay for her marketing services. Williams’ prevailed in court and obtained a judgment against the defendant. However, she never saw a dime. According to Williams, “The verdict had no teeth. The defendant dissolved her LLC, closed her bank and credit card accounts and all but vaporized after losing in court.”

So, there is a real risk that you could do everything right – file your Complaint in the proper venue, properly serve the defendant, show up to court and submit your evidence, and get a judgement in your favor – only to wind up with nothing. Actually, you would not wind up with nothing. You’d actually lose money since you are responsible for the filing fees and related court costs to get your claim into a small claims court.

Chapter 2
Cost of Your Time

Contract Dispute Should Not Cost You a Day of Your Life

The financial risks of filing a small claim and not actually recovering on that claim are very real. Though, another cost associated with the antiquated, inefficient small claims system is the cost of your time.

The time cost of a small claim is highlighted by Dane Wilcox, a small business owner who filed a small claim against an Uber driver after they drove away with a bag containing a $2,000 laptop and other personal items. Wilcox prevailed in court and was awarded $4,000 against the Uber driver. However, the process was extremely time-consuming. Wilcox has to go to court twice in order to collect the full amount owed.

“I spent a whole work day making sure I had every document I needed for trial,” said Wilcox. “I also spent time before that preparing and trying to work it out over the phone with Uber. I spent a portion of my plane flights memorizing every detail.”

Think about that for a moment. A full day spent making sure each document was organized and ready for trial. Hours spent on the phone trying to negotiate with a large corporation. Even more hours spend memorizing each and every detail to be fully prepared to make a cogent argument before a judge. And this only covers the time you choose to invest to prepare your claim. There is the additional, embedded time-loss associated with the court system itself. By that, we mean the lag time between filing your claim and actually having it heard before a judge. In many jurisdictions, it can take weeks, or even months, to get a hearing scheduled. And that does not take into consideration  the possibility that the defendant asks for a continuance or other scheduling conflicts that could result in delay.

If you believe you may have a viable claim, you first need to determine whether your claim meets the jurisdictional requirements of the small claims court in your particular locality. As you can see, right off the bat, this can create confusion. Each city within each state typically has its own unique set of courts. The burden is on you to figure out which one has the jurisdictional authority over your claim. The proper "venue" for your small claim can be determined by a multitude of factors and could even depend on the particular nature of your civil claim. For example, if you are involved in a car accident, the proper venue is most often in the county in where the collision occurred or where the other motorist involved in the accident resides. If, on the other hand, your small claim relates to an alleged breach of contract, the proper venue is usually in the county where the contract was formed.

There is no doubt about it – the current small claims system is a relic of the past. The inefficiencies and complexities are simply too much to bare.

There has to be a better way.

Chapter 3
The Benefits

Benefits of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)

  1. Reduced Cost

  2. Greater Efficiency and Flexibility

  3. Keeping the Legal Dispute Confidential

  4. Utilizing the Services of a Neutral Third Party

  5. Creating an Environment Where Cooperative and Collaborative Negotiations Can Take Place

  6. Creating an Environment Where Cooperative and Collaborative Negotiations Can Take Place

Filing a Complaint in small claims court is not the only way to resolve your legal dispute. Even if you have already filed the small claims paperwork, you have the option to try and negotiate a settlement via Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). You may be thinking, “what the heck is ADR?” Well, ADR is shorthand for different methods of out-of-court conflict resolution, including arbitration, mediation, and negotiation. There are a myriad of benefits associated with utilizing ADR. Here are a just a few examples:

Benefit No.1 – Reduced Cost

As highlighted in the first two chapters, the court system in the United States is not efficient and can be quite costly. The process of discovery (e.g., collecting and printing documents, depositions, etc.) can cause the legal bills to accumulate, especially if you were to try and retain the services of an experienced attorney. If you are a business owner who is sued by a customer, the costs associated with litigation can be just as burdensome and onerous as an individual suing a company. The owner of a business can wind up losing a significant sum of money and time on gathering documents, reviewing documents, and devoting time to court hearings. ADR can greatly reduce these costs by providing a quicker, more streamlined resolution. As a result, businesses can focus more on their bottom line and individuals involved in litigation can focus their time on family and other ventures, rather than dedicating hours to pre-trial preparation and litigation.

Benefit No. 2 – Greater Efficiency and Flexibility

Depending on the type of claim, it is quite possible for litigation to drag on for months, or even years, before the case actually goes to trial or is ultimately resolved. When the parties agree to a form of ADR, it may provide an opportunity to reach a more efficient and amicable solution. The parties can schedule ADR at virtually any time without having to wait for on the court to schedule a hearing. This not only speeds up the process but provides greater flexibility to the parties.

Benefit No. 3 – Keeping the Legal Dispute Confidential

Court filings are akin to airing dirty laundry. This is because court documents are public records. This means your Complaint, the defendant’s Answer, the transcripts of court hearings, etc. are accessible and retrievable by members of the general public. On the other hand, the statements made and documents exchanged during ADR are kept confidential. If you reach a settlement through mediation or arbitration, there is no public record of what developed at the negotiation or of the amount of the agreed settlement.

Benefit No. 4 – Utilizing the Services of a Neutral Third Party

Court filings are akin to airing dirty laundry. This is because court documents are public records. This means your Complaint, the defendant’s Answer, the transcripts of court hearings, etc. are accessible and retrievable by members of the general public. On the other hand, the statements made and documents exchanged during ADR are kept confidential. If you reach a settlement through mediation or arbitration, there is no public record of what developed at the negotiation or of the amount of the agreed settlement.

Benefit No. 5 – Creating an Environment Where Cooperative and Collaborative Negotiations Can Take Place

ADR proceedings are oftentimes less contentious and acrimonious when compared to litigation. It allows the parties to get to the heart of the dispute and come to a fair and amicable resolution. This enables the parties to preserve any prior relationships (e.g., if the dispute is between two friends, two neighbors, two business partners, etc.).

In addition to the five benefits described above, studies support the fact that ADR gets results. For example, the American Arbitration Association reported that over 85 percent of all mediations that take place actually lead to an amicable settlement between the parties. This is the case even when multiple prior attempts at reaching a settlement failed, where the parties were pessimistic about the prospects of reaching an amicable settlement, and where parties spent large amounts of money and time preparing for a trial.

ADR is often effective because common sense prevails. Why expend valuable time and money to duke it out in court when you can achieve virtually the same resolution out of court and save those valuable resources? For example, let’s say two friends from college decide to start a business together which specializes in manufacturing metal bins. The two friends have been successful in growing the business over the past five years and are practically brothers. All of a sudden, the government introduces a tariff on the metal they use to manufacture their bins and they are forced to either shut down the business or pivot into a different line of work. The stress and difficulty associated with this unexpected adversity leads to tension and discord between them. Accusations are made and a lawsuit is filed. Both of them retain legal counsel at are paying for those services at an hourly rate. The business is forced to shut down and they remain embroiled in litigation for three years. In that time, the only thing that has changed is that their bank accounts are vastly reduced due to the cost of paying legal fees, court fees, costs of attending hearings, lost business, etc. If that was not bad enough, their friendship has been ruined. This is not a “worst case scenario.” In fact, this is quite a common occurrence in the U.S. civil court system.

But what if those same friends decided to utilize a form of alternative dispute resolution? Well, those two friends could have retained an experienced mediator who speaks to both of them and understands what each is trying to achieve. One of the friends wants to end the business entirely while the other friend wants to pivot into manufacturing plastic bins.

The mediator helps facilitate an amicable resolution where the business remains open and pivots to plastic bins, but the friend who wants to leave the business has the option to do so and will simply receive a royalty on future bins sold. That way, both sides achieve their objective. They execute a settlement agreement and the entire process is completed is a matter of days.

This is not a rosy “best case” scenario. It is simply highlighting the real results achieved using ADR. Given the effectiveness and efficiencies associated with ADR, more companies and individuals are utilizing online arbitration and dispute resolution apps to resolve legal disputes.

Chapter 4
In with the New

Benefits of Using an Arbitration App & Small Claims App

“Globally, the majority of internet usage is done via a mobile device and for most people the mobile web will be their primary - if not their only - way of experiencing the internet and the world.”
- Peter Rojas, Co-founder of Engadget and Gizmodo

There is no doubt that we are living in the midst of a technological revolution. Practically every aspect of life has become digitized and wi-fi accessible. Alternative dispute resolution services are no different. In fact, the utilization of arbitration apps and small claims apps has developed its own niche in the ADR field - Online Dispute Resolution (ODR).

ODR utilizes alternative dispute resolution processes to resolve a claim or dispute in purely digital form. ODR is most often used to resolve disputes arising from an online transaction such as purchasing an item on EBay or Amazon. ODR can involve the parties in arbitration, mediation, and/or negotiation via web-based technology. ODR can be done entirely online through:

  • Email
  • Videoconferencing
  • Live Chat

Typically, the online dispute resolution process consists of the following steps:

  1. A customer will initiate a claim by filing a complaint on an ODR platform.
  2. After the complaint is filed, the other party receives a notice and is prompted to take part in the online dispute resolution;
  3. The other party is also offered to ability to argue their position regarding the allegation within the complaint.
  4. The dispute typically goes one of two ways:
    1. the other party agrees to resolve the dispute amicably, or
    2. the party disagrees with the complaint and requests further dispute resolution.
  5. When the latter happens, the parties enter a communication stage in the hopes of resolving the matter.
  6. The communication stage usually involves a third party (e.g., mediator or conciliator), whose role may be different depending on the model used for the dispute resolution process. The two most widespread kinds of such processes are automated and assisted negotiation.
  7. In automated negotiation, a decision-making algorithm is utilized to help the parties reach a resolution. The dispute resolution process is fully automated and based on choose-and-react behavior. A prime example is double-blind bidding. When the parties enter the dispute resolution process, they let each other know of their offers and demands. The algorithm then compares the submissions of each party to determine whether they are within mutually-agreeable limits. The procedure repeats until both parties reach a resolution
  8. If you want to have a live person involved in the ODR, that is possible. Many companies include a system where live mediators and arbitrators are available to help facilitate the dispute resolution by using a neutral internet platform.

There are also situations where a combination of online and off-line dispute resolution methods are used. Some e-commerce companies even provide ODR as a complimentary service to customers. For example, eBay and PayPal pioneered the use of ODR to resolve online transaction disputes.  The ODR system used by eBay resolves approximately 60 million disputes each year and 90 percent of those dispute are resolved without further escalation.

Following eBay’s example, prominent tech company PayPal established an elaborate, tier-based ODR system. If you have a problem involving a Paypal transaction, you can file either a dispute or a claim. For a dispute, when a buyer initiates the ODR, PayPal will place a hold on the transaction’s funds until a resolution is achieved. PayPal will then ask for a response from the seller to get a better sense of what happened. PayPal then facilitates a discussion between the buyer and seller. They have 20 days to come up with a resolution.

If a resolution is not reached within 20 days, either party has the option to escalate the matter to a claim. At that point, PayPal investigates the case and determines an outcome. Once PayPal renders a decision, the seller retains the option to appeal. Though, a seller only has the right to file an appeal under three circumstances: (1) the item is returned to seller, but not in the same condition as the buyer first received it; (2) no item was ever returned, or (3) the wrong item was returned.

Studies Show ODR is Effective

PayPal and eBay agreed to conduct a joint study to compare the behavior of ODR participants before and after the process. For example, eBay decided not to look at what users said after the ODR, but at their actions as buyers or sellers after participating in the ODR. The results of the study were quite revealing. Participation in ODR resulted in increased activity by both “winners” of the dispute (e.g., the party that received a reimbursement) and those who lost (e.g., did not receive a reimbursement).

Other Online Companies Follow Suit

PayPal and eBay are not the only online companies utilizing ODR. For example, if there is a dispute concerning a domain name, the parties can pursue online arbitration via ICANN. This service adheres to a Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (often referred to as the "UDRP"). Under this policy, disputes concerning trademark-based domain names are resolved by agreement, court action, or arbitration before a domain name registrar decides to cancel, suspend, or transfer the domain. In these disputes, the allegations typically revolve around cybersquatting (i.e. abusive registration of a domain name intended to extract money from another party). According to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and the National Arbitration Forum (NAF), ICANN has proven to be extremely effective in resolving disputes via the domain name arbitration process. Studies have shown that ICANN has helped improved efficiency and decisions are usually rendered in less than 40 days.

Benefits of Using Online Dispute Resolution

As you can see by the examples above, ODR works, which is why it has gained popularity in resolving various disputes among businesses and customers. Some of the clear benefits to utilizing a small claims app, arbitration app, or other form of online dispute resolution include:

  • Cost – ODR is less expensive than the traditional legal process in most cases.
  • Efficiency –ODR can often resolve a dispute in a matter of days, as opposed to months or years in traditional litigation.
  • Participation and Control – Parties using ODR are required to work with each other to resolve the dispute and often have more control and ownership over the outcome.
  • Flexibility – Parties using ODR have more flexibility in dictating the terms of the outcome.
  • Jurisdictional flexibility - ODR enables parties in different geographic locations or jurisdictions to avoid the costs and inconveniences of traveling to a court.

The numerous benefits of ODR are evident, which is why it is now being utilized not just by private companies and customers, but by government entities. For example, property tax assessors in the United States and Canada are beginning to adopt ODR services to save on administrative costs and provide more efficient resolutions to members of the general public.

It is apparent that people in the United States, and even abroad in countries like Canada, are demanding change when it comes to resolving legal dispute.

“People are marching away from the courthouses. It’s up to us to figure out how we can change that,” said Darin Thompson, legal counsel at the British Columbia Ministry of Justice.

Thompson highlighted the fact that British Columbia’s ODR system services 45 percent of individuals seeking resolution to a legal dispute. Participants praise the system and cite the tremendous convenience, especially when they cannot get away from work to go to court. Thompson went on to highlight the indirect benefits of a robust ODR system. For example, he pointed out that public funds and personnel that used to be devoted to small claims disputes are now being used to reduce the massive backlog of criminal and family law cases while ODR helps resolve the bulk of civil small claims.

Thompson demonstrated how the system works by leading the audience through the online forms for a fictional claimant named Sarah who bought a $2,500 refrigerator that was never delivered. He explained how the early steps are automated, but the later steps involve human mediators who try – usually successfully – to resolve disputes online, by phone and by email.

Salter said she knows some lawyers fear ODR will take away their work, especially if it can be expanded to more complex and lucrative disputes.

“My response to that, as a lawyer, is society doesn’t owe you a living,” Salter said. “If you make your living because justice processes haven’t changed since William the Conqueror and they’re still byzantine and they’re still complex and you happen to know how to navigate them, that is not an interest that society should protect. So if by simplifying processes we take away your work, you need to change the nature of your work.”

There is no doubt that the future of dispute resolution is here.

Chapter 5
Embrace the Change

Online Dispute Resolution is Going to Become the New Normal

“Being online is not the end goal. The end goal is to take the justice system and go to where people are.”
- Shannon Salter, Chair of the B.C. Civil Resolution Tribunal

Multiple studies show that the majority of Americans are becoming increasingly disenfranchised with the civil court system due to the unreasonable amount of time and money associated with achieving a resolution in a legal dispute. If that was not bad enough, attorneys reject between 80 percent and 95 percent of all civil cases due to the economic realities of running a successful legal practice. This means most attorneys do not accept small claims because they are typically do not generate the fees necessary to run a legal practice.

These economic realities are why dispute resolution online has exploded in usage and popularity. If the trends continue, ODR will become the new norm rather than a cutting edge “option” for businesses and individuals. ODR is being utilized for disputes beyond simple e-commerce transactions. For example, eBay and other online companies offer online dispute resolution services related to a seller receiving a negative review from a customer. And, as mentioned, government entities are beginning to embrace online dispute resolution to save time and money.

So, if you have a small claim, do not waste your hard-earned money and precious time filing a Complaint in an archaic court system. Instead, embrace the future and use a small claims app or arbitration app to get your legal dispute resolved today.

Chapter 6
The Zeyo Advantage

Using Online Arbitration to Resolve Legal Disputes

Now that you have a firm understanding of small claims court, alternate dispute resolution, and ODR, it’s time to discuss how Zeyo can help you settle your claim faster, easier, and better than small claims court. We built Zeyo to make this process faster, more cost effective and easier, so that you can get on with your life. Here’s how it works:

  1. File your claim: state your case, upload your evidence, and tell us how much your seeking in damages. We’ll contact your opponent electronically, and if needed, by certified mail.
  2. Resolution: your opponent can choose to settle right away, or seek a hearing. In the event that your opponent doesn’t respond, we can help you seek recourse in a court of law.
  3. Hearing: our highly trained, neutral arbitrators will hear your case, review the statements & evidence, and render a judgment that is legally binding, and court enforceable.
  4. Award: if you lose your case, we will recommend best practices for next steps. If you are awarded a monetary judgment, we’ll help you process the payment from your opponent so you can move on. Easy-peezy.

All in all, we can help you resolve your small claims dispute about 10 times faster than a typical small claims court.

Who are your arbitrators?

Zeyo is committed to fairness, quality, and anti-discrimination in everything we do, including in the appointment of our arbitrators. That’s why our arbitrators are:

Fair
  • Neutral
  • Conflict-free
  • Independent from Zeyo itself
  • Fielded by the nonprofit [Center for Conflict Resolution]
  • Paid and retained the same regardless of who wins
Quality
  • Zeyo trained & certified
Anti-descrimination
  • Selected in a race-, gender-, and identity-blind process

Additionally, in order to guarantee fairness, Zeyo does not collect or use data on ruling patterns in order to determine who can be a Zeyo arbitrator, or who gets appointed.

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